Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. In her free time, Jane enjoys nature writing and photography. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service and combines photography and nature writing on her blog, CommonWanderer.com. She lives in Monkton.

Angela Evancie / VPR file

A bill that won unanimous approval in the Vermont Senate last week appears likely to face a partisan split in the House. 

DSZC / iStock

It might be the most difficult ride of your life. You're in the car with your aging parent at the wheel and it becomes glaringly obvious that their driving skills have diminished. Possibly to the point of being dangerous to them and to others on the road.

Patti Daniels / VPR

Vermont's Republican governor asked the Legislature to deliver a state law that blunts some of federal law enforcement's ability to identify undocumented people for deportation. The state Senate unanimously agreed, and now the House will weigh in. So where do Republican legislators stand on the question?

eatcute / iStock

Ask a roomful of Vermonters to explain school choice and you will probably get several different answers depending on where they're from. If they hail from two different school choice or "tuitioning" towns, they could have varying rules. And if they come from a town without school choice, they might not even understand what you're talking about.

Jacques Coughlin / NPR (2006)

NPR's Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman covers the military and Defense Department, and has reported from Afghanistan and Iraq for the network. Bowman is also an alum of Saint Michael's College, and he's been working with the college to encourage more veterans to attend.

Gina Nemirofsky / Ten Times Ten LLC

You know the story of Malala Yousafzai, a Pakistani girl who was almost assassinated for advocating for girls' education, and who later won a Nobel Peace Prize for efforts. But a new book by Vermont writer reminds us there are millions of Malalas in the world, and the barriers to their education are profound.

Kuriputosu / iStock

Some people in the U.S. who are worried about changes in policy are making their way to the Canadian border to seek asylum. And they've had to cross the border into Canada illegally.

Saint Michael's College Athletics Department, courtesy

With a father who was a World Cup skier for France and a mother who skied on the national team of Spain, skiing was in the stars for Saint Michael's College alpine ski team members Meggane and Guillaume Grand. 

BraunS / iStock

Is our country losing faith in science? Can scientists stick up for the value of the scientific method — and its place in society — without being sucked into politicized debate and partisan squabbles?

terroa / istock

Why are yawns contagious? Why do we hiccup? How do teeth get loose? Why do your ears hurt when you drive up over the mountains? Why do we get dizzy when we spin? Why do people slip? Why do people faint? Why do we have saliva and mucus? Why do people cry when they get hurt? How do voice boxes work? Why does your voice sound weird when it's recorded? Dr. Lori Racha has more answers to your body questions.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR

After nearly two years in the position, Eric Miller's final day serving as the U.S. Attorney for the district of Vermont was Feb. 10. He had announced his resignation one week prior to that in a news release issued by his office.

Angela Boyle / The Ladybroad Ledger

A self-described "femme alt comics newspaper" is popping up throughout locations in Vermont and is seeking submissions from "lady-identifying, lady-presenting, or lady-like" cartoonists in the state.

Alessandra Tarantino / AP

Moses Pendleton grew up on a dairy farm in the Northeast Kingdom, and at Dartmouth College he turned to dance. He became a world-renowned dancer and choreographer, even choreographing parts of the Olympics ceremonies for the 1980 Lake Placid games and the 2014 Sochi games.

Top: Taylor Dobbs, VPR; Angela Evancie, VPR; Vadim Ghirda, AP

We'll hear the latest on how lawmakers in Montpelier are responding to President Trump's orders on immigration. Plus, an exit interview with former U.S. Attorney Eric Miller, and a conversation with Vermont-raised choreographer Moses Pendleton.

Bodnarchuk / iStock

When they rank states with the biggest bullying problems, Vermont is safely near the bottom: 44th out of 46 states on the list. And bullying in Vermont schools has remained relatively flat over the past four years. So what's the problem?

Nata_Snow / iStockphoto.com

In the midst of the cold weather and sometimes dreary days of winter, there is a certain appeal to curling up with a good book and getting lost in its pages for a little while.

LeFion / iStock

Debate keeps raging over coyote hunting in Vermont — both about the ethics and the impact on the local ecosystem.

Jane Lindholm / VPR

Student newspapers at high schools and colleges are often the proving ground for budding journalists. But in Vermont right now, there's a debate over how much "freedom of the press" applies to these young news gatherers.

Nina Keck / VPR

People across Vermont and around the world have been transfixed by the immigration story that has unfolded in the last two weeks - and especially the impact on refugees. In the midst of it, VPR's Nina Keck was reporting on the Syrian refugee crisis from Jordan.

Vladone / iStockphoto.com

Quebec's far-right groups may not have played a direct role in a mosque shooting late last month, but some worry that extremist language is heating up and may be pushing some people to action.

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